gailsimone:

lawebloca:

Friends

I almost died just now.

I wouldn’t mind if this was the last thing I saw before oblivion.

dinolich:

Ms. Marvel #6

Basically I’m wolverine now

(via oldspencer)

brianmichaelbendis:

All the Single Ladies (Batgirl, Zatanna, Wonder Woman) by Cliff Chiang.

brianmichaelbendis:

All the Single Ladies (Batgirl, Zatanna, Wonder Woman) by Cliff Chiang.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Why not fall in love?
deathbyjazzhands deathbyjazzhands Said:

brianashanee:

I got shit to do

sodamnrelatable:

image

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this should constantly be on my dash just every few days

(via tehzii)

sixsixsith:

real life.

And to think, the world will never have this treasure.

This guy turned into the best Deadpool ever.

This guy turned into the best Deadpool ever.

(via danceswithwampas)

goldenheartedrose:

qoyqoyi:

cinematicnomad:

apparently e.l. james called former child star mara wilson (matilda) a “sad fuck” for critiquing the 50shades books a while ago and now there’s a feud. i love it.

this gives me hope.

I love her. Oh my god.

(via realhousewivesofnightvale)

active-rva:

On this day in 1967, the United States Supreme Court issued a decision on the case Loving v. Virginia. The case was brought by Mildred and Richard Loving, a mixed black and Native woman and a white man who had been sentenced to a year in prison each for getting married, under Virginia’s anti-interracial marriage laws. 
Police raided their home in the middle of the night, hoping to discover them having sex, which would confer an additional criminal charge. When the Lovings pointed out their marriage license (issued in Washington DC, where the marriage was legal), it was used in court as evidence against them, as marriage between a person considered white and a person considered non-white was at this time a felony.
They plead guilty and were told that their sentence would be suspended (not carried out) if they left the state. They did so, moving to DC, but faced so much trouble trying to visit relatives in Virginia (as they could not live or travel together there, under threat of a year in prison) that they appealed the ruling. 
The court decided in favor of the Lovings, declaring laws against interracial marriage to be unconstitutional. This case was a landmark Civil Rights victory, and it happened only 47 years ago. 

My Mom was alive before this happened. She lived in a world where loving someone of a different skin color wasn’t legal.
The fight doesn’t stop until all love is legal.

active-rva:

On this day in 1967, the United States Supreme Court issued a decision on the case Loving v. Virginia. The case was brought by Mildred and Richard Loving, a mixed black and Native woman and a white man who had been sentenced to a year in prison each for getting married, under Virginia’s anti-interracial marriage laws. 

Police raided their home in the middle of the night, hoping to discover them having sex, which would confer an additional criminal charge. When the Lovings pointed out their marriage license (issued in Washington DC, where the marriage was legal), it was used in court as evidence against them, as marriage between a person considered white and a person considered non-white was at this time a felony.

They plead guilty and were told that their sentence would be suspended (not carried out) if they left the state. They did so, moving to DC, but faced so much trouble trying to visit relatives in Virginia (as they could not live or travel together there, under threat of a year in prison) that they appealed the ruling. 

The court decided in favor of the Lovings, declaring laws against interracial marriage to be unconstitutional. This case was a landmark Civil Rights victory, and it happened only 47 years ago. 

My Mom was alive before this happened. She lived in a world where loving someone of a different skin color wasn’t legal.

The fight doesn’t stop until all love is legal.

(via nerdyravenclawqueen)

fishingboatproceeds:

Earlier today, I met with several students at Addis Ababa University to discuss the opportunities and challenges they face in their academic and professional lives. 

One of the biggest challenges we have here on the Internet is hearing marginalized and underrepresented voices, especially those across the digital divide. You can’t amplify voices online that aren’t online.

While all of the young people I talked to used the Internet and most had regular access via a tablet, smartphone, or laptop, none had blogs or tumblrs or YouTube channels, and none had social network interactions with people outside their IRL social networks. I’m sure there are English-language tumblrs from Ethiopian students (although I haven’t been able to find any today), but almost all voices—even highly educated and privileged ones—from the world’s poorest countries go completely unheard online.

(And when we do hear them, it’s usually through an intermediary: videos edited by someone else, transcripts of interviews, etc. It’s not direct participation in the conversation by, for instance, posting to tumblr or reblogging HIMYM gifs. [The students I spoke to agreed that HIMYM is the best American show they have on TV, although a couple said that watching TV was a waste of time and a distraction from studying, to which I said HAVE YOU SEEN PHINEAS AND FERB BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY EDUCATIONAL.])

Anyway, all of this is a long preamble to say: Earlier today I met with a 20-year-old law student who helped found an organization in Ethiopia devoted to empowering women and ending gender-based violence. (I’ll include her talking about her work in a video soon.)

The organization does fundraisers so the poorest women at the university can have access to contraception, and every year they have a Blood Drive for Mothers, where many students donate blood to combat maternal death. (Post-partum hemorrhaging is a too-common cause of death among Ethiopian women.)

We often think of global charity as people from rich countries giving money to people from poor countries. But the real story is much more complicated (and much more exciting!); we just don’t hear those stories often, because organizations like the one founded by the young woman I met don’t have YouTube videos or tumblrs.

My love life in a nutshell.

(via riotoftime)

And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.

spiffyjiffy:

blue-haired-fallen-angel:

boite-de-rhythm:

poyzn:

#11 was done on The Office to Dwight.

shit son

#9 goes hard

DID #1 CAUSE SOMEONE TO HAVE A STROKE OMG IM DYING

I did number 18 at a party. Drunk people kept finding cookies in their pockets. It was great.

I feel guilty for laughing so hard because I’m pretty sure some of this is psychological abuse. Ya know, the kind that ruins friendships but makes a good story.

(via nerdyravenclawqueen)